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Free Fire
review

Free Fire

Free Fire assembles the tetchiest brand of characters cinema screens have seen in a while. Most of them seem to have gotten out of bed with ill intent, or at the very least, the desire to just vex someone. The problem for them is this film centers on an arms deal in a warehouse so, needless to say, sparks start flying around in a gunpowder pit.

Predator
review

Predator

After Alien: Covenant shifted cinematic tectonic plates, I thought seeing 1987’s Predator for the first time in almost 15 years was in order. Shane Black’s reboot is around the corner and you never know – there may be some dirty little secret at the centre of this franchise which alters our cinematic reality (and mind you, it shares a universe with Alien).

A United Kingdom
review

A United Kingdom

What would happen if I brought a white woman home and said; Mama, she’s the one. It'll be fine I guess. There would be some eyebrows raised, with increasing murmurs the further you got from nuclear family, but it'll be fine. However, when it becomes a matter of general scrutiny; the optics of a chief or presidential candidate with a white better half, folks would not be having it. So the idea of a mixed race couple with a royal half in the pre-colonial Africa is scandalously daunting, to put it lightly.

Alien: Covenant
review

Alien: Covenant

I now get the Prometheus gripes. Despite being thoughtful and absorbing on a philosophical level, I acknowledged that Ridley Scott’s first Alien prequel was a slippery slope, but a slippery slope I was content to run up and down on. But as we closed in on the denouement of the second Alien prequel, Alien: Covenant, I was certain I would never think of the first two films the same way again.

Colossal
review

Colossal

Colossal may be one of the more bizarre films I see in 2017. Ballsy even, but not because there is some unworldly execution on the part of our director, Nacho Vigalondo. Simply because it goes all out on its preposterous conceit whilst somehow managing to stay grounded in character and real-world struggles.

The Fate of the Furious
review

The Fate of the Furious

I wasn’t sure before, but I am now – we no longer have to take the Fast and Furious films seriously. I could deal with the luxury sports cars flying from sky scraper to sky scraper. I could deal with cars bursting out of the cockpits of exploding planes. I could deal with characters speaking to each other normally over deafening engines at top speed. I’m pretty sure defended the plausibility of the final action sequence with the safes in Fast Five.

Sembene! - The tragedy of African cinema

Sembene! - The tragedy of African cinema

The 2015 documentary, Sembene! is a welcome tribute to the father of African cinema, Ousmane Sembene. We spend a chunk of the film soaking in co-director (alongside Jason Silverman), Samba Gadjigo’s reverence for the Senegalese filmmaker as he recounts the impact of Sembene, decades before they eventually met. “When I was 14 I dreamed of being French, like the characters in the books I read in high school,” we hear Gadjigo say. Fast forward three years and the acuity of Sembene’s work had him proclaim “I no longer wanted to be French. I wanted to be African.”

John Wick: Chapter Two
review

John Wick: Chapter Two

John Wick: Chapter Two left me with a lot to muse on for a film ostensibly with the simplest of narratives. For one, it is the first R-rated film I’ve seen in a packed theatre. The squeals of girls at the plentiful head shots were a welcome addition to the experience. There was a uniform wince as our eponymous hero tried his version of the Joker’s disappearing pencil magic trick and a lot of faces were buried in palms when knives were whipped out for thrilling close quarter duels.

Ousmane Sembène's Xala
review

Ousmane Sembène's Xala

My walk with Senegalese director, Ousmane Sembène continues with his 1975 film Xala, an adaptation of Sembène's 1973 novel of the same name. It’s the most modern of his films I have seen as yet, set some 15 years after Senegal’s independence. After a film like Emitai, where the French occupiers were the subject of Sembene’s scorn, the African elite is firmly in our director’s sights as he exhibits some scathing disdain for upper class who wasted little time in selling out.

Kong: Skull Island
review

Kong: Skull Island

This may be one of the few times my aversion to trailers may not have paid off. Happiness and satisfaction, as always, are functions of expectations. My baseline going into Kong: Skull Island was Peter Jackson’s King Kong which I can’t say I properly engaged, but damn, the sequences with the oversized spiders and scorpions and man sucking grubs still creep me out to this day.

Logan
review

Logan

James Mangold’s Logan presents to us a broken world with damaged people. The first line of film, "Fuck", is blurted out with a sense of weariness that hovers over this world. It also lays the groundwork for a series that has been waiting 17 years for an R-rating. It doesn’t take long into the running time for the film to unleash its full violent splendour affirming its departure from superhero movie PG-13 norm.

The Lego Batman Movie
review

The Lego Batman Movie

I spent the screening of The Lego Batman Movie battling sleep. That surprised and disappointed me. It's Batman. I love Batman. Anything Batman should be able to grasp me for 90-plus minutes. But therein lies the question. Was this a Batman movie or Batman roast? This latest entry to the Lego movie franchise felt like the latter and that also upset me a little, in addition to being a bore fest. "Batman should be revered and not mocked", I seemed to be screaming internally the few times I engaged with the film.

Moonlight
review

Moonlight

It truly has been a while since a decision to immerse myself in a piece of cinema came with the reward of an emotionally overwhelming experience. Bless you Moonlight, bless you Barry Jenkins for your masterful and beautiful humanist approach to your characters, for chucking away the surface and reaching for the crux of your subjects with soothing poetic finesse unperturbed the joys or heartbreak that lie beneath.

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