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My Father Die
review

My Father Die

Directed by Sean Brosnan ( our very own Pierce Brosnan’s son), My Father Die tells the story of a deaf man, Asher (Joe Anderson) on a collision course with his abhorrent and sociopath father, Ivan (Gary Stretch) in the rural American south. To call their relationship dysfunctional is an understatement given the first time we see them together, Ivan bashes the hearing out of Asher’s head then proceeds to brutalise the life of his older son, Chester. Details, almost animalistic in nature, abound but let’s just say Chester had his hand in a cookie jar labelled Ivan.

Manchester by the Sea
review

Manchester by the Sea

Kenneth Lonergan’s Manchester by the Sea manages to be one of the funniest films of 2016 whilst wielding affecting moments of distress and heartbreak. The bleakness of this picture has been overemphasised. Expectations had been inflated. But Lonergan manages to milk a welcome brand of dark humour that doesn’t make light work of a crux wrapped in its powerful layered examination of grief.

Ousmane Sembene’s Emitai
review

Ousmane Sembene’s Emitai

How about some Senegalese spice - Ousmane Sembene’s 1971 film, Emitai, is fueled by a spirit of protest that resonates decades on. The fact it wasn’t released in Sembene’s home country of Senegal and censored in other francophone countries endorses the strength of its message in a time when colonialism was something more tangible than chapters in textbooks.

Arrival
review

Arrival

Chaos is order yet undeciphered – the line that opens Denis Villeneuve’s 2013 film, Enemy. Two films later and hints of that idea are at play in the brilliant Canadian director’s latest film, Arrival. Unlike Enemy, Arrival presents a clearer narrative and denouement that is tied up in a knot of simplicity that still has the power to overwhelm.

Hacksaw Ridge
review

Hacksaw Ridge

Mel Gibson’s Hacksaw Ridge embraces the paradox ethos ingrained in Christianity. This film is about a pacifist who goes above and beyond in the line of duty during the Second World War. It looks to affirm the value of human life amidst the carnage of intense bloody battles on the Japanese island of Okinawa where human life is spent in droves to very little avail.

Elle
review

Elle

Paul Verhoeven’s new film, Elle, provides more joy than you would expect from a film that opens with a rape. It helps that the victim of the sexual assault, Isabelle Huppert’s Michele Leblanc brushes of the trauma like dust from the harmattan with chilling nonchalance. When she reveals her ordeal to her friends, it’s as casual as it gets; over dinner with a bottle of champagne on ice.

Nocturnal Animals
review

Nocturnal Animals

Nocturnal Animals, Tom Ford’s gripping and devastating meta-textual mystery, left me heavy at heart. I am enamoured by impenitently bleak narratives but Ford manages to mesh character and tone in a queasy union that left some dissonance lingering within by the time the resolution tapped me on the shoulder.

Rogue One
review

Rogue One

It only took about 40 years but “wars” in the Star Wars title has finally been justified. Rogue One, the latest entry in the Star Wars franchise, directed by Godzilla’s Gareth Edwards, slots into the period leading up to Episode IV, A New Hope. A lot of people died to get us these plans, is the line I remember in reference to the Empire’s dreaded Death Star schematics and Edwards breathes life into what is almost a throwaway screw in the early Star Wars lore with this riveting adventure romp.

Captain Fantastic
review

Captain Fantastic

The family at the centre of Captain Fantastic is one the most enigmatic I’ve come across on screen. The patriarch of this family, Ben Cash (Viggo Mortensen), is raising his six children off the grid in the woods outside Washington, USA. The family lives off nature as evidenced by their ornate treehouses or the game they have to hunt and crops they have to tend by way of food. Then there’s the ideological spectrum this family operates on.

Hell or High Water
review

Hell or High Water

To toe the line of the wittertainment quip, Hell or High Water sports its fair share of bank heists, but it is far from a film about bank robbers and their escapades. It has two law men that jump on the trail of the robbers, but their relationship and not the investigation will probably come to be of more interest. The screenplay, by Taylor Sheridan of Sicario fame, leans very much towards character and presents some of the most subtle and exacting chemistry that drives this modern western to its understated but compelling finale.

Doctor Strange
review

Doctor Strange

I was running late for the screening of Marvel’s latest offering, Doctor Strange but I wasn’t too bothered. I was expecting the usual MCU schematic for origin stories and to some extent, that is precisely the end product although there is a welcome deviation from what I know to be the Doctor Strange source material as it offers a refreshing edge to the MCU, a classy aesthetic and most importantly, the rare 2016 sighting of sensible and justified use of CGI.

The Accountant
review

The Accountant

One of my favourite podcasters posits the idea of the perfect action movie having a Tomatometer score hovering around 50 percent. Watching The Accountant, I was reminded that for a good amount of time, till maybe The Matrix and Bourne films came along, the perfect action film needed a certain degree of cheese and ridiculous contrivances to hit home and The Accountant is almost fine throwback in that regard.

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