War for the Planet of the Apes

7.8 based on 4 ratings

A sequel to Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.

War for the Planet of the Apes
review

War for the Planet of the Apes

It is hard for me to look back on Matt Reeves’ War for the Planet of the Apes and not feel some simmering disappointment. The hype was contagious, expectations were sky high and I was primed to declare War for the Planet of the Apes the resolution to one of the finest film trilogies. But by the end, I felt character spent a little too much time battling spectacle. Reeves appeared to be invested in the “war” aspect of film’s title.

War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) Review
review

War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) Review

War for the Planet of the Apes is directed by Matt Reeves (Cloverfield, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes) and stars Andy Serkis (The Lord of the Rings, Avengers: Age of Ultron) and Woody Harrelson (The Hunger Games, Zombieland). "After the apes suffer unimaginable losses, Caesar wrestles with his darker instincts and begins his own mythic quest to avenge his kind". War for The Planet of the Apes is set to conclude the series...will it go out on a high note?

All signs point to 'go see' War for the Planet of the Apes. Get ready.

All signs point to 'go see' War for the Planet of the Apes. Get ready.

This week's release of War for the Planet of the Apes, the direct sequel to Matt Reeves Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014), marks the official halfway point among this summer's 'blockbuster' films. And depending on what you've consumed, Reeves' third film in the "Planet of the Apes" reboot series appears set to join the likes of 'Baby Driver' and 'Wonder Woman' among this summer's "best of" film contenders.

'War for the Planet of the Apes' to Bring Back a Character from the 1968 Original

'War for the Planet of the Apes' to Bring Back a Character from the 1968 Original

The modernised retelling of the Planet of the Apes story has given a few nods to the original films from the 60s and 70s, but for the most part it's kept itself mostly standalone and separate. This makes sense, given that it's in a sense a prologue to those events, and who knows if the new films will eventually cross into the same timeline that the originals did.