Michael Fassbender as Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs

7.9 based on 2 ratings

Set backstage at three iconic product launches and ending in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac, Steve Jobs takes us behind the scenes of the digital revolution to paint an intimate portrait of the brilliant man at its epicenter.

Steve Jobs (2015) Film Review
review

Steve Jobs (2015) Film Review

Without indulging in hyperbole, director Danny Boyle created the most under-appreciated film of 2015 with the latest rendition of Steve Jobs' personal and professional life. Wearing the filmmaker's trademark sentimentality, Steve Jobs feels as though it belongs on a stage, and ironically at times its purely cinematic moments are where it doesn't quite reach the heights of its dynamic, bouncy narrative.

18. Steve Jobs

18. Steve Jobs

Most biopics take artistic license to tell a story over reality, and that nagging feeling never really leaves when watching this. However, the unconventional narrative and structure presented here is what makes it stand out. The film is broken into three segments, each filmed in a different format. Danny Boyle's Steve Jobs is a tribute to a man that was difficult to figure out and second guess. It's a window to a time in our recent history, so important to our future, shaped by someone we'll never see the likes of again within the tech industry.

REVIEW: Steve Jobs
review

REVIEW: Steve Jobs

This review contains spoilers! [YouTube.com/FilmGob] — Steve Jobs takes us behind the scenes of the digital revolution, a portrait of the man at its epicenter. The story unfolds backstage at three iconic product launches, ending in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac.