'The Kitchen' review
review

'The Kitchen' review

Allow me second to wipe this clown makeup off. Your boy thought 'The Kitchen' was going to be 2019’s Widows. Why the high expectations? Maybe its because it was adapted from a DC Vertigo comic. Or maybe it was just the cast which included three exciting actresses; Tiffany Haddish, Elisabeth Moss and Melissa McCarthy, who I expected to bring varying degrees of excellence to the table. 'The Kitchen' is also a 1970s New York crime flick so what could go wrong? Everything, apparently.

'I Am Mother' Review
review

'I Am Mother' Review

It’s always a great sign when piece of sci-fi cinema leaves you with chill-inducing ideas to mull over. Netflix's ‘I am Mother’, the largely contained feature debut from filmmaker Grant Sputore, gets a load of credit on this front. On the flip side, 'I Am Mother' also leaves you with fists clenched because of the frustrating lack of restraint keeping it from rising to something resembling exceptional.

'Anna' review
review

'Anna' review

My first impulse after ‘Anna’ was to dismiss it as entirely trash. Then I calmed down, slept on it for a day and decided most of it was merely bland leaving the screenplay as the sole disastrous component. Even though I had set my bar right in the core of the earth’s crust, somehow this aggressive troll job of a film found a way to be clotheslined into my 2019 pit of shame; where ‘Glass’ longed for some company.

'Godzilla: King of the Monsters' review
review

'Godzilla: King of the Monsters' review

Of my many cinematic regrets, not seeing Garth Edwards' 'Godzilla' on the big screen towers over my other qualms. Procrastination, always a thief of time, can also be a thief of joy. Edwards' 2014 film angles the titan as an awe-inspiring deity impossible to comprehend but deserving of our worship. Edwards did not think us worthy enough of the full splendor of Godzilla, feeding him to us in bits with an infectious sense of sweeping wonder heightened by Alexandre Desplat's majestic score.

'John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum' review
review

'John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum' review

There is a poetic coda to 'John Wick Chapter 2'; which sets the thrilling agenda for the third entry in what must be, pound for pound, the pinnacle of action cinema. Our hero, the perpetually zen merchant of death John Wick (Keanu Reeves) has just been made aware he has an hour until an open contract is put on his head and all the worlds assassins are on his trail. His response: “tell them, tell them all. Whoever comes, whoever it is, I'll kill them. I'll kill them all". This feels like a line from the most violent children’s book ever written. But it's an iambic declaration of violence from a man set to make his last stand.

'Avengers: Endgame' review
review

'Avengers: Endgame' review

'Avengers: Endgame' says thank you to comic book movie fans for over a decade of support by milking more bundles of cash from them. I’m sorry but I had to give my inner Grinch some air. The essence of ‘Endgame’ is something I tend to reject; the idea of cinema becoming product and placing fan service over art.

'Hotel Mumbai' review
review

'Hotel Mumbai' review

If I had bet the house on the most upsetting thing in a film about the Mumbai terror attack in India being the atrocities depicted, I would be homeless. 'Hotel Mumbai' packs a harrowing punch, strong enough to engage emotions in the manner Paul Greengrass does as he recounts the mass murder committed by Anders Behring Breivik in ‘22 July’. But distasteful garnishes of levity sour a reflection on a bleak moment in recent history.

'Us' review
review

'Us' review

The idea of rapper M.anifest’s record ‘Invisible’ was front and centre in my mind as the thesis of Jordan Peele’s stunning sophomore effort, ‘Us’ was rather bizarrely laid before us. I had just been put on to M.anifest’s song a few days prior, in which he reflects on the repressed of the social strata. Peele is very much concerned with the Invisibles of society, to chillingly violent effect, in a bloodthirsty satire that is more politically charged than most expected.

'The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind' review
review

'The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind' review

“Democracy is like imported cassava. It rots quickly.” This sentiment nods to the underlying decay that forms the poignant subtext of Chiwetel Ejiofor’s feature debut ‘The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind’. Based on a true story, Ejiofor’s project, as expected, does what it says on the can, serving bouts of inspiration and dignity but there is a consideration of detail that elevates this film to a quietly distressing experience for African audiences.

'Alita: Battle Angel' review
review

'Alita: Battle Angel' review

What makes Alita so special? It’s the only real question I had going into Robert Rodriguez’s 'Alita: Battle Angel'. My loose knowledge of this Anime/Manga adaptation had me looking towards the likes of 'Akira', 'Ghost in a Shell' and even 'Blade Runner' as I tried to measure expectations. The lengthy development period had me primed for a film dense with messy but ambitious ideas about humanity and identity. But Alita never reaches for such heights. And this disappointed for a second.

'Cold Pursuit' review
review

'Cold Pursuit' review

So, Liam Neeson dug a deep hole for himself ahead of the release of his latest film ‘Cold Pursuit’. Friends and colleagues have had to assure me that it will all be alright in the end for Neeson, that tanking the publicity for ‘Cold Pursuit’ and admitting to a racist blood lust wouldn’t drown out one of my favorite actors.

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